Lake Rotorua

4.0 from 8 Votes
Rotorua

Rotorua is one of the most interesting places on our planet, because nowhere in the world are so many geysers, hot springs and mud lakes found, as there are here. This unique natural paradise is located on the territory of New Zealand, occupying a volcanic plateau. This most intense in geothermal activity area in the world, is located in the very southwest corner of Lake Rotorua. The area can be reached by road from Auckland, which is about 3 hours from here.

Nearly 1200 geysers, bubbling mud ponds and earth cracks emerging from the steam them are located literally every two steps. Springing from the earth hot water smells strongly of sulfur and therefore Rotorua is often called the Land of sulfur. The name of the place comes from the language of the local population for whom this is another sacred territory. The language of the Maori, for which Rotorua is an important place, related to traditions and their history over the centuries, Roto means lake, and Rua is translated as two. The most common translation is “two lakes”.

The volcanic fissure, which extends under the settlements here, is about 200 km - from the White Isle to the "Bay of Plenty and from Lake Taupo to the volcanoes of Tongariro National Park on the North Island.

In the area of Rotorua is also located the town, which was founded in the 19th century, in the northeastern part of North Island of New Zealand. He town has around 53, 000 inhabitants.

Rotorua is the center, around which prosper forestry, farming and light industry. Interesting to visit is the Institute for the Arts, which operates since 1967. From this initial class, today some students are teachers. In the Institute, the students learn not only the art of wood carving, but also nurture their awareness that they are the ones who must keep the arts alive.

Rainbow Springs Nature Park has a real wealth of flora and fauna. Here visitors can see some representatives of local fauna - eel, trout, iguana, tuatara and kiwi bird

Добави Отзив